Tuesday , January 19 2021

Diabetes in the limelight news



About 50% or more of people who currently have diabetes in South Africa are still undiagnosed and unaware of it.

It was revealed by Grote Schuur Health and Professional Hospital during the World Diabetes Day event at the hospital on Wednesday 14 November.

According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the incidence of diabetes in South Africa stands at 5.4% (but it also depends on the ethnic group as it is higher in Indians), according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). So there are about 1.9 million adults with diabetes in South Africa.

Dave referred to an assembly of health professionals, health activists and patients.

Instead of giving a lecture on diabetes, he called on the meeting to celebrate the achievements of diabetics.

"(Let's) admit that this disease of diabetes is unfortunately very common, it knows no limits, it does not discriminate and it is largely on the increase," Dave said.

He called on the health workers to lead the example by becoming more active – going to the hospital, using the stairs instead of taking the elevator, reducing the sugar and carbohydrates, and not smoking.

His colleague, Professor Ian Ross, took this one step further: "Today we must recognize patients and people with diabetes, family members who care for them, and nursing staff who relentlessly provide care for them."

Ross has been reflected on the challenges faced by diabetics face every day and the countless decisions they are forced to make because of the disease.

Sister Grotta Schuur Yolanda Mtati was six years old when she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1999 and says it has changed her life ever since. She said she had a hard time dealing with lifestyle changes, and watching other kids eat what they wanted did even more. "I was very young and it's hard for my mother to inject her child and I need to be hospitalized and I could not go to school."

However, she says if managed well, it is not the end of the world. "If you take your medicine – I'm dependent on insulin, I have to inject myself regularly, wherever I go I take it with me – it does not mean it's the end of life."

Mtati, from Khayelitsha, says with the support of family and friends, she managed to finish school and finish her tertiary studies, in 2014 she became a nurse at Groote Schuur.

Warren Driscoll (26), a patient with type 1 diabetes from Claremont, collects his medications from the hospital and goes to check every three months. He was born with the disease. "I inherited it – it's a family gift given by God," he joked.

When asked how he coped with the disease, Driscoll said: "It's challenging, I have to see what I eat, I have to inject myself three times a day, I also have to see my sugar, if my sugar is too high, Too low, I can not exercise, it actually keeps a narrow line all the time. "

The musician's message to other diabetics was: "Think twice about what you eat, look for yourself now so you can live a longer life."

The director of nursing at the hospital, Agamat Muhammad, thanked the two doctors, nurses and patients for their efforts. He encouraged employees to spread awareness about diabetes.

Meanwhile, the city of Cape Town announced in a statement last week that its health department recorded more than 30 000 clients who were screened for diabetes in January-June this year and the staff expect to double the total number of radiotherapy last year which reached 21 000 (January to December).

The department also began to encourage high-risk people to visit screening clinics, the statement said.

City clinics have reported a significant increase in lifestyle-related diseases over the last decade, especially in poorer communities, says Mayco member of the city for security, security and social services, JPM Smith, in a statement.

Global drug company Cipla said in a statement that the prevalence of diabetes among adults is growing worldwide, and estimates that by 2040, the situation will become one of the leading causes of death in South Africa.

God Atlas of IDF Diabetes It is estimated that one out of 11 adults currently has diabetes, and worldwide, the situation accounts for more than 12.8 percent of deaths among people aged 20 to 79, the statement said.

About 50% or more of people who currently have diabetes in South Africa are still undiagnosed and unaware of it.

It was revealed by Grote Schuur Health and Professional Hospital during the World Diabetes Day event at the hospital on Wednesday 14 November.

According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the incidence of diabetes in South Africa stands at 5.4% (but it also depends on the ethnic group as it is higher in Indians), according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). So there are about 1.9 million adults with diabetes in South Africa.

Dave referred to an assembly of health professionals, health activists and patients.

Instead of giving a lecture on diabetes, he called on the meeting to celebrate the achievements of diabetics.

"(Let's) admit that this disease of diabetes is unfortunately very common, it knows no limits, it does not discriminate and it is largely on the increase," Dave said.

He called on the health workers to lead the example by becoming more active – going to the hospital, using the stairs instead of taking the elevator, reducing the sugar and carbohydrates, and not smoking.

His colleague, Professor Ian Ross, took this one step further: "Today we must recognize patients and people with diabetes, family members who care for them, and nursing staff who relentlessly provide care for them."

Ross has been reflected on the challenges faced by diabetics face every day and the countless decisions they are forced to make because of the disease.

Sister Grotta Schuur Yolanda Mtati was six years old when she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1999 and says it has changed her life ever since. She said she had a hard time dealing with lifestyle changes, and watching other kids eat what they wanted did even more.

"I was very young and it's hard for my mother to inject her child and I need to be hospitalized and I could not go to school."

However, she says if managed well, it is not the end of the world. "If you take your medicine – I'm dependent on insulin, I have to inject myself regularly, wherever I go I take it with me – it does not mean it's the end of life."

Mtati, from Khayelitsha, says with the support of family and friends, she managed to finish school and finish her tertiary studies, in 2014 she became a nurse at Groote Schuur.

Warren Driscoll (26), a patient with type 1 diabetes from Claremont, collects his medications from the hospital and goes to check every three months. He was born with the disease. "I inherited it – it's a family gift given by God," he joked.

When asked how he coped with the disease, Driscoll said: "It's challenging, I have to see what I eat, I have to inject myself three times a day, I also have to see my sugar, if my sugar is too high, Too low, I can not exercise, it actually keeps a narrow line all the time. "

The musician's message to other diabetics was: "Think twice about what you eat, look for yourself now so you can live a longer life."

The director of nursing at the hospital, Agamat Muhammad, thanked the two doctors, nurses and patients for their efforts. He encouraged employees to spread awareness about diabetes.

Meanwhile, the city of Cape Town announced in a statement last week that its health department recorded more than 30 000 clients who were screened for diabetes in January-June this year and the staff expect to double the total number of radiotherapy last year which reached 21 000 (January to December).

The department also began to encourage high-risk people to visit screening clinics, the statement said.

City clinics have reported a significant increase in lifestyle-related diseases over the last decade, especially in poorer communities, says Mayco member of the city for security, security and social services, JPM Smith, in a statement.

Global drug company Cipla said in a statement that the prevalence of diabetes among adults is growing worldwide, and estimates that by 2040, the situation will become one of the leading causes of death in South Africa.

God Atlas of IDF Diabetes It is estimated that one out of 11 adults currently has diabetes, and worldwide, the situation accounts for more than 12.8 percent of deaths among people aged 20 to 79, the statement said.

About 50% or more of people who currently have diabetes in South Africa are still undiagnosed and unaware of it.

It was revealed by Grote Schuur Health and Professional Hospital during the World Diabetes Day event at the hospital on Wednesday 14 November.

According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the incidence of diabetes in South Africa stands at 5.4% (but it also depends on the ethnic group as it is higher in Indians), according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). So there are about 1.9 million adults with diabetes in South Africa.

Dave referred to an assembly of health professionals, health activists and patients.

Instead of giving a lecture on diabetes, he called on the meeting to celebrate the achievements of diabetics.

"(Let's) admit that this disease of diabetes is unfortunately very common, it knows no limits, it does not discriminate and it is largely on the increase," Dave said.

He called on the health workers to lead the example by becoming more active – going to the hospital, using the stairs instead of taking the elevator, reducing the sugar and carbohydrates, and not smoking.

His colleague, Professor Ian Ross, took this one step further: "Today we must recognize patients and people with diabetes, family members who care for them, and nursing staff who relentlessly provide care for them."

Ross has been reflected on the challenges faced by diabetics face every day and the countless decisions they are forced to make because of the disease.

Sister Grotta Schuur Yolanda Mtati was six years old when she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1999 and says it has changed her life ever since. She said she had a hard time dealing with lifestyle changes, and watching other kids eat what they wanted did even more. "I was very young and it's hard for my mother to inject her child and I need to be hospitalized and I could not go to school."

However, she says if managed well, it is not the end of the world. "If you take your medicine – I'm dependent on insulin, I have to inject myself regularly, wherever I go I take it with me – it does not mean it's the end of life."

Mtati, from Khayelitsha, says with the support of family and friends, she managed to finish school and finish her tertiary studies, in 2014 she became a nurse at Groote Schuur.

Warren Driscoll (26), a patient with type 1 diabetes from Claremont, collects his medications from the hospital and goes to check every three months. He was born with the disease. "I inherited it – it's a family gift given by God," he joked.

When asked how he coped with the disease, Driscoll said: "It's challenging, I have to see what I eat, I have to inject myself three times a day, I also have to see my sugar, if my sugar is too high, Too low, I can not exercise, it actually keeps a narrow line all the time. "

The musician's message to other diabetics was: "Think twice about what you eat, look for yourself now so you can live a longer life."

The director of nursing at the hospital, Agamat Muhammad, thanked the two doctors, nurses and patients for their efforts. He encouraged employees to spread awareness about diabetes.

Meanwhile, the city of Cape Town announced in a statement last week that its health department recorded more than 30 000 clients who were screened for diabetes in January-June this year and the staff expect to double the total number of radiotherapy last year which reached 21 000 (January to December).

The department also began to encourage high-risk people to visit screening clinics, the statement said.

City clinics have reported a significant increase in lifestyle-related diseases over the last decade, especially in poorer communities, says Mayco member of the city for security, security and social services, JPM Smith, in a statement.

Global drug company Cipla said in a statement that the prevalence of diabetes among adults is growing worldwide, and estimates that by 2040, the situation will become one of the leading causes of death in South Africa.

God Atlas of IDF Diabetes It is estimated that one out of 11 adults currently has diabetes, and worldwide, the situation accounts for more than 12.8 percent of deaths among people aged 20 to 79, the statement said.

About 50% or more of people who currently have diabetes in South Africa are still undiagnosed and unaware of it.

It was revealed by Grote Schuur Health and Professional Hospital during the World Diabetes Day event at the hospital on Wednesday 14 November.

According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the incidence of diabetes in South Africa stands at 5.4% (but it also depends on the ethnic group as it is higher in Indians), according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). So there are about 1.9 million adults with diabetes in South Africa.

Dave referred to an assembly of health professionals, health activists and patients. Instead of giving a lecture on diabetes, he called on the meeting to celebrate the achievements of diabetics.

"(Let's) admit that this disease of diabetes is unfortunately very common, it knows no limits, it does not discriminate and it is largely on the increase," Dave said.

He called on the health workers to lead the example by becoming more active – going to the hospital, using the stairs instead of taking the elevator, reducing the sugar and carbohydrates, and not smoking.

His colleague, Professor Ian Ross, took this one step further: "Today we must recognize patients and people with diabetes, family members who care for them, and nursing staff who relentlessly provide care for them."

Ross has been reflected on the challenges faced by diabetics face every day and the countless decisions they are forced to make because of the disease.

Sister Grotta Schuur Yolanda Mtati was six years old when she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1999 and says it has changed her life ever since. She said she had a hard time dealing with lifestyle changes, and watching other kids eat what they wanted did even more. "I was very young and it's hard for my mother to inject her child and I need to be hospitalized and I could not go to school."

However, she says if managed well, it is not the end of the world. "If you take your medicine – I'm dependent on insulin, I have to inject myself regularly, wherever I go I take it with me – it does not mean it's the end of life."

Mtati, from Khayelitsha, says with the support of family and friends, she managed to finish school and finish her tertiary studies, in 2014 she became a nurse at Groote Schuur.

Warren Driscoll (26), a patient with type 1 diabetes from Claremont, collects his medications from the hospital and goes to check every three months. He was born with the disease. "I inherited it – it's a family gift given by God," he joked.

When asked how he coped with the disease, Driscoll said: "It's challenging, I have to see what I eat, I have to inject myself three times a day, I also have to see my sugar, if my sugar is too high, Too low, I can not exercise, it actually keeps a narrow line all the time. "

The director of nursing at the hospital, Agamat Muhammad, thanked the two doctors, nurses and patients for their efforts. He encouraged employees to spread awareness about diabetes.

Meanwhile, the city of Cape Town announced in a statement last week that its health department recorded more than 30 000 clients who were screened for diabetes in January-June this year and the staff expect to double the total number of radiotherapy last year which reached 21 000 (January to December).

City clinics have reported a significant increase in lifestyle-related diseases over the last decade, especially in poorer communities, says Mayco member of the city for security, security and social services, JPM Smith, in a statement.

Global drug company Cipla said in a statement that the prevalence of diabetes among adults is growing worldwide, and estimates that by 2040, the situation will become one of the leading causes of death in South Africa.

God Atlas of IDF Diabetes It is estimated that one out of 11 adults currently has diabetes, and worldwide, the situation accounts for more than 12.8 percent of deaths among people aged 20 to 79, the statement said.

About 50% or more of people who currently have diabetes in South Africa are still undiagnosed and unaware of it.

It was revealed by Grote Schuur Health and Professional Hospital during the World Diabetes Day event at the hospital on Wednesday 14 November.

According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the incidence of diabetes in South Africa stands at 5.4% (but it also depends on the ethnic group as it is higher in Indians), according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). So there are about 1.9 million adults with diabetes in South Africa.

Dave referred to an assembly of health professionals, health activists and patients.

Instead of giving a lecture on diabetes, he called on the meeting to celebrate the achievements of diabetics.

"(Let's) admit that this disease of diabetes is unfortunately very common, it knows no limits, it does not discriminate and it is largely on the increase," Dave said.

He called on the health workers to lead the example by becoming more active – going to the hospital, using the stairs instead of taking the elevator, reducing the sugar and carbohydrates, and not smoking.

His colleague, Professor Ian Ross, took this one step further: "Today we must recognize patients and people with diabetes, family members who care for them, and nursing staff who relentlessly provide care for them."

Ross has been reflected on the challenges faced by diabetics face every day and the countless decisions they are forced to make because of the disease.

Sister Grotta Schuur Yolanda Mtati was six years old when she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1999 and says it has changed her life ever since. She said she had a hard time dealing with lifestyle changes, and watching other kids eat what they wanted did even more.

"I was very young and it's hard for my mother to inject her child and I need to be hospitalized and I could not go to school."

However, she says if managed well, it is not the end of the world. "If you take your medicine – I'm dependent on insulin, I have to inject myself regularly, wherever I go I take it with me – it does not mean it's the end of life."

Mtati, from Khayelitsha, says with the support of family and friends, she managed to finish school and finish her tertiary studies, in 2014 she became a nurse at Groote Schuur.

Warren Driscoll (26), a patient with type 1 diabetes from Claremont, collects his medications from the hospital and goes to check every three months. He was born with the disease. "I inherited it – it's a family gift given by God," he joked.

When asked how he coped with the disease, Driscoll said: "It's challenging, I have to see what I eat, I have to inject myself three times a day, I also have to see my sugar, if my sugar is too high, Too low, I can not exercise, it actually keeps a narrow line all the time. "

The musician's message to other diabetics was: "Think twice about what you eat, look for yourself now so you can live a longer life."

The director of nursing at the hospital, Agamat Muhammad, thanked the two doctors, nurses and patients for their efforts. He encouraged employees to spread awareness about diabetes.

Meanwhile, the city of Cape Town announced in a statement last week that its health department recorded more than 30 000 clients who were screened for diabetes in January-June this year and the staff expect to double the total number of radiotherapy last year which reached 21 000 (January to December).

The department also began to encourage high-risk people to visit screening clinics, the statement said.

City clinics have reported a significant increase in lifestyle-related diseases over the last decade, especially in poorer communities, says Mayco member of the city for security, security and social services, JPM Smith, in a statement.

Global drug company Cipla said in a statement that the prevalence of diabetes among adults is growing worldwide, and estimates that by 2040, the situation will become one of the leading causes of death in South Africa.

God Atlas of IDF Diabetes It is estimated that one out of 11 adults currently has diabetes, and worldwide, the situation accounts for more than 12.8 percent of deaths among people aged 20 to 79, the statement said.

About 50% or more of people who currently have diabetes in South Africa are still undiagnosed and unaware of it.

It was revealed by Grote Schuur Health and Professional Hospital during the World Diabetes Day event at the hospital on Wednesday 14 November.

According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the incidence of diabetes in South Africa stands at 5.4% (but it also depends on the ethnic group as it is higher in Indians), according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). So there are about 1.9 million adults with diabetes in South Africa.

Dave referred to an assembly of health professionals, health activists and patients.

Instead of giving a lecture on diabetes, he called on the meeting to celebrate the achievements of diabetics.

"(Let's) admit that this disease of diabetes is unfortunately very common, it knows no limits, it does not discriminate and it is largely on the increase," Dave said.

הוא קרא לעובדי הבריאות להוביל את הדוגמה, על ידי כך, להיות פעילים יותר – ללכת לבית החולים, תוך שימוש במדרגות במקום לקחת את המעלית, לצמצם את הסוכר והפחמימות, ולא לעשן.

עמיתו, פרופסור איאן רוס, עשה את זה צעד נוסף: "היום עלינו להכיר בחולים ואנשים עם סוכרת, בני משפחה המטפלים בהם וצוות סיעודי שנותנים ללא לאות לטפל בהם".

רוס השתקף על האתגרים בחולי סוכרת פנים כל יום ואת אינספור החלטות שהם נאלצים לעשות בגלל המחלה.

אחות גרוטה Schuur Yolanda Mtati היה בן שש כאשר היא אובחנה עם סוכרת סוג 1 בשנת 1999 ואומר שזה שינה את חייה מאז. היא אמרה שהיא מתקשה להתמודד עם השינויים באורח החיים, וצפייה ילדים אחרים אוכלים את מה שהם רוצים עשה את זה עוד יותר. "הייתי צעיר מאוד וקשה לאמי להזריק לה את הילד שלה ואני צריך לאשפז ולא יכולתי ללכת לבית הספר".

עם זאת, היא אומרת אם הצליח היטב, זה לא סוף העולם. "אם אתה לוקח את התרופה שלך – אני תלוי באינסולין, אני חייב להזריק את עצמי באופן קבוע, לכל מקום שאני הולך אני לוקח את זה איתי – זה לא אומר שזה סוף החיים."

Mtati, מ Khayelitsha, אומר עם תמיכה של בני משפחה וחברים, היא הצליחה לסיים את בית הספר לסיים את לימודי השלישון שלה, בשנת 2014 היא הפכה לאחות ב Groote Schuur.

וורן דריסקול (26), חולה סוכרת מסוג 1 מקלארמונט, אוסף את התרופות שלו מבית החולים והולך לבדוק מדי שלושה חודשים. הוא נולד עם המחלה. "ירשתי את זה – זו מתנה משפחתית שנתן אלוהים, "התלוצץ.

בתשובה לשאלה כיצד הוא מתמודד עם המחלה, אמר דריסקול: "זה מאתגר. אני צריך לראות מה אני אוכל, אני צריך להזריק לעצמי שלוש פעמים ביום. אני גם צריך לראות את הסוכר שלי – אם הסוכר שלי גבוה מדי, אני לא יכול לממש ואם זה נמוך מדי, אני לא יכול לממש. זה בעצם שומר על קו צר כל הזמן ".

המסר של המוסיקאי לחולי סוכרת אחרים היה: "חשוב פעמיים על מה שאתה אוכל. חפשו את עצמכם עכשיו כדי שתוכלו לחיות חיים ארוכים יותר. "

מנהל הסיעוד בבית החולים, אגמת מוחמד, הודה לשני הרופאים, לאחיות ולמטופלים על מאמציהם. הוא עודד את העובדים להפיץ את המודעות לסוכרת.

בינתיים, העיר של קייפ טאון הודיעה בהצהרה בשבוע שעבר כי מחלקת הבריאות שלה רשמה יותר מ -30 000 לקוחות אשר הוקרנו לסוכרת בחודשים ינואר עד יוני השנה וצוות לצפות להכפיל את המספר הכולל של הקרנות בשנה שעברה, אשר הגיע 21 000 (ינואר עד דצמבר).

עוד נאמר בהצהרה כי המחלקה החלה לפעול לעידוד אנשים בסיכון גבוה לביקור במרפאות להקרנה.

מרפאות העיר דיווחו על עלייה משמעותית במחלות הקשורות לסגנון חיים בעשור האחרון, במיוחד בקהילות עניות יותר, אומר חבר ה- Mayco של העיר לביטחון, לביטחון ולשירותים חברתיים, ג'יי.פי סמית 'בהצהרה.

חברת התרופות הגלובלית Cipla חשפה בהצהרה כי שכיחות הסוכרת בקרב מבוגרים הולכת ומתרחבת ברחבי העולם, והיא מעריכה כי עד שנת 2040, המצב יהפוך לאחד הגורמים המובילים למוות בדרום אפריקה.

God אטלס סוכרת צה"ל מעריכים כי לאחד מכל 11 מבוגרים יש כיום סוכרת, ובעולם, המצב מהווה יותר מ -12.8% ממקרי המוות בקרב אנשים בגילאים 20 עד 79, נכתב בהצהרה.

בערך 50% או יותר של אנשים שיש להם כיום סוכרת בדרום אפריקה הם עדיין לא מאובחנים ולא מודעים להם את זה. זה נחשף על ידי בית החולים Grote Schuur בריאות מקצועי במהלך אירוע יום סוכרת העולמי בבית החולים ביום רביעי 14 נובמבר.

פרופ 'יואל דייב, ראש אגף אנדוקרינולוגיה בבית החולים, אומר על פי הפדרציה הבינלאומית לסוכרת (צה"ל), שכיחות הסוכרת בדרום אפריקה עומדת על כ -5.4% (אבל זה תלוי גם בקבוצה האתנית כפי שהיא גבוהה יותר בהודים ), כך שיש כ -1.9 מיליון מבוגרים עם סוכרת בדרום אפריקה.

דייב התייחס לאספה של אנשי מקצוע בתחום הבריאות, פעילי בריאות וחולים.

במקום לתת הרצאה על סוכרת, הוא קרא על המפגש כדי לחגוג את ההישגים של חולי סוכרת.

"(בואו) מודים כי מחלה זו של סוכרת היא למרבה הצער נפוצה מאוד, היא לא יודעת גבולות, זה לא להפלות וזה במידה רבה על הגידול", אמר דייב.

הוא קרא לעובדי הבריאות להוביל את הדוגמה, על ידי כך, להיות פעילים יותר – ללכת לבית החולים, תוך שימוש במדרגות במקום לקחת את המעלית, לצמצם את הסוכר והפחמימות, ולא לעשן.

עמיתו, פרופסור איאן רוס, עשה את זה צעד נוסף: "היום עלינו להכיר בחולים ואנשים עם סוכרת, בני משפחה המטפלים בהם וצוות סיעודי שנותנים ללא לאות לטפל בהם".

רוס השתקף על האתגרים בחולי סוכרת פנים כל יום ואת אינספור החלטות שהם נאלצים לעשות בגלל המחלה.

אחות גרוטה Schuur Yolanda Mtati היה בן שש כאשר היא אובחנה עם סוכרת סוג 1 בשנת 1999 ואומר שזה שינה את חייה מאז. היא אמרה שהיא מתקשה להתמודד עם השינויים באורח החיים, וצפייה ילדים אחרים אוכלים את מה שהם רוצים עשה את זה עוד יותר. "הייתי צעיר מאוד וקשה לאמי להזריק לה את הילד שלה ואני צריך לאשפז ולא יכולתי ללכת לבית הספר".

עם זאת, היא אומרת אם הצליח היטב, זה לא סוף העולם. "אם אתה לוקח את התרופה שלך – אני תלוי באינסולין, אני חייב להזריק את עצמי באופן קבוע, לכל מקום שאני הולך אני לוקח את זה איתי – זה לא אומר שזה סוף החיים."

Mtati, מ Khayelitsha, אומר עם תמיכה של בני משפחה וחברים, היא הצליחה לסיים את בית הספר לסיים את לימודי השלישון שלה, בשנת 2014 היא הפכה לאחות ב Groote Schuur.

וורן דריסקול (26), חולה סוכרת מסוג 1 מקלארמונט, אוסף את התרופות שלו מבית החולים והולך לבדוק מדי שלושה חודשים. הוא נולד עם המחלה. "ירשתי את זה – זו מתנה משפחתית שנתן אלוהים, "התלוצץ.

בתשובה לשאלה כיצד הוא מתמודד עם המחלה, אמר דריסקול: "זה מאתגר. אני צריך לראות מה אני אוכל, אני צריך להזריק לעצמי שלוש פעמים ביום. אני גם צריך לראות את הסוכר שלי – אם הסוכר שלי גבוה מדי, אני לא יכול לממש ואם זה נמוך מדי, אני לא יכול לממש. זה בעצם שומר על קו צר כל הזמן ".

המסר של המוסיקאי לחולי סוכרת אחרים היה: "חשוב פעמיים על מה שאתה אוכל. חפשו את עצמכם עכשיו כדי שתוכלו לחיות חיים ארוכים יותר. "

מנהל הסיעוד בבית החולים, אגמת מוחמד, הודה לשני הרופאים, לאחיות ולמטופלים על מאמציהם. הוא עודד את העובדים להפיץ את המודעות לסוכרת.

בינתיים, העיר של קייפ טאון הודיעה בהצהרה בשבוע שעבר כי מחלקת הבריאות שלה רשמה יותר מ -30 000 לקוחות אשר הוקרנו לסוכרת בחודשים ינואר עד יוני השנה וצוות לצפות להכפיל את המספר הכולל של הקרנות בשנה שעברה, אשר הגיע 21 000 (ינואר עד דצמבר).

עוד נאמר בהצהרה כי המחלקה החלה לפעול לעידוד אנשים בסיכון גבוה לביקור במרפאות להקרנה.

מרפאות העיר דיווחו על עלייה משמעותית במחלות הקשורות לסגנון חיים בעשור האחרון, במיוחד בקהילות עניות יותר, אומר חבר ה- Mayco של העיר לביטחון, לביטחון ולשירותים חברתיים, ג'יי.פי סמית 'בהצהרה.

חברת התרופות הגלובלית Cipla חשפה בהצהרה כי שכיחות הסוכרת בקרב מבוגרים הולכת ומתרחבת ברחבי העולם, והיא מעריכה כי עד שנת 2040, המצב יהפוך לאחד הגורמים המובילים למוות בדרום אפריקה.

God אטלס סוכרת צה"ל מעריכים כי לאחד מכל 11 מבוגרים יש כיום סוכרת, ובעולם, המצב מהווה יותר מ -12.8% ממקרי המוות בקרב אנשים בגילאים 20 עד 79, נכתב בהצהרה.


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