Sunday , July 25 2021

The ship from the Soyuz boat arrives on the door for the first time since the dramatic launch has passed away – Spacfluo now



<img src = "data: image / gif; base64, R0lGODlhAQABAIAAAAAAAP /// yH5BAEAAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAIBRAA7" class = "lazy hidden" data-lazy-type = "iframe" data-lazy-src = ""alt =" "/>

Keeping a tradition that returns until the dawn of the Space Age, a Russian Soyuz rocket emerged from a hangar at the Baikonur Kosmodrome in Kazakhstan before sunrise on Saturday to launch to Put Padon No. 1 at the central Asian space base, going on position for Monday of extraordinary Monday with an American-Russian crew leading for the International Space Station.

The journey from the Soyuz-FG railroad at the same point of view used in Yuri Gagarin's historic first trip in the 1961 space took place in the early morning, a traditional time for the transfer of Russian rockets from its hangars to its launch paths.

But for the first time since 1984, the Soyuz launcher was run out with a ship crew on board to return the respected Russian spacecraft to a service after a rocket failure. In this case, the Soyuz returned flying after the emergence disappeared in September 1983, exploding two Soviet cosmonautons in security after their Soyuz rocket was fired during the final calculation.

On Saturday, Russian technicians moved the Soyuz rocket to the pocket for the first crew launch since October 11, the exploitation of the Russian commander Alexey Ovchinin and the NASA engineer Nick Nago in the orbit followed the International Space Station. Ovchinin and Hago disembarked safely a few miles behind Baikonur, and Russian researchers said they were dealing with the failure of a sensor component in the separation system for the first four stages of Soyuz's rockets.

One of the operators failed to separate two minutes after removal, leading the Soyuz computer to order automatic shutdown. Escape rockets pushed the capsule carrying Ovchinin and Hagon away from the disintegrating rocket, and the crew briefly met 6.7 G, when they fled during their fall back to Earth, finally killing on the Kazakhstan.

Soyuz's rockets have been successfully launched four times since October 11, a launching was launched, most recently on November 16, when the Soyuz-FG rocket – the same variant used for naval missions – emptied an automated Progressive ship on a trip to the space station .

With a four-four-four record over the past six weeks, the Soyuz rocket is restarted that the crew throws Monday by raising scheduled at 6:31 a.m. EST (1131 GMT; 5:31 p.m. Baikonur-tempo).

The next shift launch was moved up on December 20 after the launch failure in October, to ensure that they would launch before the current third personal crew must return to Earth and reduce the time the orbitic investigation only precedes Three residents on board – not the normal complement of six.

The crew of three people flying in the spaceship Soyuz MS-11 is led by Oleg Kononenko, a Russian-based veterans Russian sparrow born in Turkmenistan, who worked as an engineer and designer in Russia's spatial program before being elected as a cosmonaut candidate in 1996. Cononenko, 54 , it flew into three space station expeditions in 2008, 2011/2012 and 2015, with 533 days in space.

NASA's astronaut Anne McClain, Russian commander Oleg Kononenko, and Canadian engineer David Saint-Jacques owns his Sokol spaces outside the fight of the Soyuz-MS-11 spacecraft on the front wing. Credit: NASA / Victor Zelentsov

Kononenko will take over the seat of the Soyuz MS 11 spacecraft during the launch and co-operation with the station, on the left hand side of the Canadian Agency of the Canadian Agency David Saint-Jacques, who will serve as a pilot. The NASA's astronaut Anne McClain will serve as a second flight engineer in the soothes right of the Soyuz capsule. Both launch their first space missions.

Saint-Jacques, 48, is from Saint-Lambert, Quebec, who has a degree in physical engineering École polytechnique de Montréal in Canada. He won Ph.D. in Astrophysics of Cambridge University in the United Kingdom, and a medical degree of Universitélaval in Canada, and helped design adaptive optics and interferomatic systems for telescopes and radiological devices for a hospital in France. Saint Jacques worked as a medical practitioner in Inuit community in Hudson Bay when he was elected as a Canadian Space Agency's astronaut candidate in 2009.

McClain is a 39-year-old military colonel and a former combat helicopter pilot that operated in Iraqi Freedom Operation. Originating from Spokane, Washington, McClain graduated in the American Military Academy's mechanical / aeronautical engineering degree at West Point, and gained a degree in aerospace engineering at the University of Bath, and a Master's degree in international relations at the University of Bristol, both in England. NASA chose McClain as an astronaut candidate in 2013.

Kononenko, Saint-Jacques and McClain will take a fast, six-hour flight to the space station, culminating in automated docking with the Poisk module at 12:36 p.m. EST (1736 GMT) Monday, when they join three other scholarships from the crew due to return to Earth on December 20.

The photos below show the launch of the Soyuz rocket at Baikonur Cosmodome on Saturday.

Credit: NASA / Aubrey Gemignani
Credit: NASA / Aubrey Gemignani
Credit: We will rub
Credit: NASA / Aubrey Gemignani
Credit: NASA / Aubrey Gemignani
Credit: We will rub
Credit: We will rub
Credit: NASA / Aubrey Gemignani
Credit: We will rub
Credit: We will rub
Credit: We will rub
Credit: NASA / Aubrey Gemignani
Credit: We will rub
Credit: We will rub
Credit: We will rub
Credit: We will rub
Credit: We will rub
Credit: NASA / Aubrey Gemignani
Credit: We will rub
Credit: We will rub

Email to the author

Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: @ StephenClark1.


Source link